© 2019 St. Vincent and the Grenadines National Trust
The St. Vincent & the Grenadines National Trust

NEWS

National Trust acquires Colony Standard Weights

The National Trust has taken possession of a large set of Standard Weights that lay hidden away in the Treasury for decades. The purpose of this set of weights and measures was to ensure that all the proprietors of St Vincent were using equal measurements. The set contains weights from 1/2 oz to 112 lbs, measures of pints and gallons and three huge containers representing 1/4, 1/2 and 1 bushel, used for dry commodities such as grain. The weights were cast in 1886 and are believed to be made of copper coated in brass. The set, which was transported from England in heavy wooden boxes with brass plaques marked "St Vincent Standard Weights and Measures," was procured by a company called V & R Blakemore & Co., a business owned by two brothers with offices in the City of London and Birmingham. Villiers and Ramsay Blakemore supplied the Standard Weights to Barbados eight years before they did so for St Vincent. The National Trust has sensitively restored and cleaned the weights and measures. It has also given the boxes some much needed TLC and hopes to have the collection on display soon.
One of the National Trust’s most pressing aims was to secure the Yambou 1 Petroglyph, which was on the site of the Argyle International Airport. The petroglyph has been relocated to the Escape Heritage Park, half a mile from its previous location. The Trust received the co-operation of various international experts in planning the move. In early 2012, an Australian team travelled to St Vincent and the Grenadines to asses the plan for the Yambou petroglyphs. The team made a detailed study of the petroglyphs in their original surroundings. This included a 3D laser scan of the rock face, which was used to design the equipment to cut the petroglyphs from the rock face and accurately relocate them. The team presented a detailed report to the Trust. Replicas of the petroglyphs are on display in the Carnegie Building. An expert from Cuba, Dr Ana Cristina Perera also travelled to St Vincent, working with the National Trust. Dr Perera conducted a preliminary investigation of the Escape Cultural Landscape. In doing this, she examined the petrogylphs at Argyle and proposed a pre-historic Caydoid site as part of the Heritage Park. The National Trust also worked with local school children to excavate the surface of the site. This resulted in some interesting finds, such as an animal adorno.

Securing the Yambou 1 Petroglyph

One of the National Trust’s key commitments is to the natural heritage of our islands and the seas around it. We are blessed to have the gigantic North Atlantic humpback whale passing through our waters during the early months of the year, as they migrate south to escape winter with their young. These magnificent creatures are still hunted by the whalers of Bequia, as a form of aboriginal subsistence whaling. with the permission of the International Whaling Commission. The National Trust has developed a project to promote the non- lethal use of this marine resource. The project valued at approximately US$28,500 is funded entirely by members and friends of the National Trust and aims to work with the whaling community of Bequia to demonstrate that whale watching is an economically viable alternative. The project includes public awareness about the North Atlantic humpback whale and other such cetaceans in our waters; restoring old whale boats for new alternative uses; and setting up a cooperative to monetize the use of old whale boats for new alternatives such as teaching sailing and whale watching. The cooperative would seek to promote traditional skills such as boat building, sailing and navigation, thus preserving dying traditions whilst also preserving the natural heritage.

Plans to save SVG's Humpback Whales

Youngsters getting ready to sail the Iron Duke, the oldest whaling ship in Bequia, now used for sailing lessons
© 2019 St. Vincent & the Grenadines National Trust
The St. Vincent & the Grenadines National Trust

NEWS

National Trust acquires

Colony Standard Weights

The National Trust has taken possession of a large set of Standard Weights that lay hidden away in the Treasury for decades. The purpose of this set of weights and measures was to ensure that all the proprietors of St Vincent were using equal measurements. The set contains weights from 1/2 oz to 112 lbs, measures of pints and gallons and three huge containers representing 1/4, 1/2 and 1 bushel, used for dry commodities such as grain. The weights were cast in 1886 and are believed to be made of copper coated in brass. The set, which was transported from England in heavy wooden boxes with brass plaques marked "St Vincent Standard Weights and Measures," was procured by a company called V & R Blakemore & Co., a business owned by two brothers with offices in the City of London and Birmingham. Villiers and Ramsay Blakemore supplied the Standard Weights to Barbados eight years before they did so for St Vincent. The National Trust has sensitively restored and cleaned the weights and measures. It has also given the boxes some much needed TLC and hopes to have the collection on display soon.
One of the National Trust’s most pressing aims was to secure the Yambou 1 Petroglyph, which was on the site of the Argyle International Airport. The petroglyph has been relocated to the Escape Heritage Park, half a mile from its previous location. The Trust received the co-operation of various international experts in planning the move. In early 2012, an Australian team travelled to St Vincent and the Grenadines to asses the plan for the Yambou petroglyphs. The team made a detailed study of the petroglyphs in their original surroundings. This included a 3D laser scan of the rock face, which was used to design the equipment to cut the petroglyphs from the rock face and accurately relocate them. The team presented a detailed report to the Trust. Replicas of the petroglyphs are on display in the Carnegie Building. An expert from Cuba, Dr Ana Cristina Perera also travelled to St Vincent, working with the National Trust. Dr Perera conducted a preliminary investigation of the Escape Cultural Landscape. In doing this, she examined the petrogylphs at Argyle and proposed a pre-historic Caydoid site as part of the Heritage Park. The National Trust also worked with local school children to excavate the surface of the site. This resulted in some interesting finds, such as an animal adorno.

Securing the Yambou 1 Petroglyph

One of the National Trust’s key commitments is to the natural heritage of our islands and the seas around it. We are blessed to have the gigantic North Atlantic humpback whale passing through our waters during the early months of the year, as they migrate south to escape winter with their young. These magnificent creatures are still hunted by the whalers of Bequia, as a form of aboriginal subsistence whaling. with the permission of the International Whaling Commission. The National Trust has developed a project to promote the non- lethal use of this marine resource. The project valued at approximately US$28,500 is funded entirely by members and friends of the National Trust and aims to work with the whaling community of Bequia to demonstrate that whale watching is an economically viable alternative. The project includes public awareness about the North Atlantic humpback whale and other such cetaceans in our waters; restoring old whale boats for new alternative uses; and setting up a cooperative to monetize the use of old whale boats for new alternatives such as teaching sailing and whale watching. The cooperative would seek to promote traditional skills such as boat building, sailing and navigation, thus preserving dying traditions whilst also preserving the natural heritage.

Plans to save SVG's

Humpback Whales

Youngsters getting ready to sail the Iron Duke, the oldest whaling ship in Bequia, now used for sailing lessons